Category Archives: Videos

How I learned to stop worrying and love the Yanmar 1GM10

Although we had some interesting sailing adventures this season, as a whole this has been the quietest sailing summer so far.  This is primarily because of this guy.  The 200 pound rusted and gristled heart of Hurry On, the Yanmar 1GM10.  When we bought Hurry On, it had been a few years since this beast ran, with the previous owner saying we could expect some black smoke.  My wintertime reading explained this was one of the symptoms of unburnt fuel, much fun to look forward to.

Checking/Changing the Oil

Job one was checking and changing the oil.  Because it was so long since the engine last ran, I tried to make sure it was lubed up before starting.  This was simply a matter of pulling out the kill switch and turning it over  for a few seconds.  In order to warm up the oil, the next step was to run the engine for a few minutes.  Being the first time in a few years, really had no idea what to expect.  Away she went, loud and banging, it sounded terrible*!  Surely this thing was going to break free of its engine mounts!  We killed the engine.  (*editor’s note –  I later discovered that the sound of this engine was completely normal.  Because it is a one cylinder, there is nothing to balance out single the piston, hence the bang! bang! bang!  Once the rmps increase, the engine actually gets considerably quieter)

There was a neat little oil extraction pump in one of the lockers, which I never used before.  You put the hose in the dipstick hole till it hits the bottom, pump about 40 times and wait about 10 minutes until you hear it gurgling up the last few drops.  For some reason, the oil filter on the Yanmar 1GM10 screws on horizontally.  This is a pain in the arse, and can get a bit messy.  You can get Yanmar filters around here for about 10 bucks, or Fram PH6607 for $7.

Changing the Fuel Filter

Remember to turn off the fuel at the tank!  If you can manage to get the filter case off, its a pretty simple replacement.  Just have to remember to bleed the engine at the three bleed points when you’re done.

Changing the Impeller

The bit that sucks the raw salt water up through the engine is the impeller.  It sits behind the alternator belt.  When I removed the speed seal, the impeller seemed to be intact with no cracks or anything.  I replaced it with the new one anyway, and kept the old one as a spare.  A little bit of dish soap for lube and then back on.  I noticed that no matter how tight the seal, there seemed to be a single drop of water that leaked out once every 10 seconds.  The leak doesn’t appear to be coming from the seal though, rather from the pump housing itself.

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Yanmar 1GM10 water pump speed seal

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Behind the seal

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Bit of dish soap to keep things lubed

Sacrificial Zinc

I should mention that for most of these engine projects, that they are made infinitely more difficult by the lack of space and accessibility.  With the exception of changing the oil, all of these jobs can only be done with only one hand, and, unless you can strategically duct tape a compact mirror and flashlight in place, you are likely navigating by feel. The zinc is inconveniently located on the port side of the engine.  And it is another one-handed, no-looking kind of thing.

In an effort to get a look at what was going on back there, I snapped a pic after I got the old plate off, this is the best I could muster.

In an effort to get a look at what was going on back there, I snapped a pic after I got the old plate off, this is the best I could muster.

Not sure how long that guy was in there but there ain't much left of it! It looked like a high temperature calking was used. I put a regular gasket in this time.

Not sure how long that guy was in there but there ain’t much left of it! It looked like a high temperature calking was used. I put a regular gasket in this time.

Alternator Belt

This was by far the quickest and easiest fix.  After a particularly squealy, noisy start, the the original belt appeared to lose quite a bit of tension.  The replacement was put on by loosening the alternator, removing old belt, putting the new one on, then snugging up the alternator with a hammer handle, and tightening back up.

Exhaust Elbow

These have a finite life.  Their job is to combine the raw water with the exhaust and safely put it out the back of the boat.  What happens over time, and what happened in our case, the inner sleeve perforated.  So when the water made it to the elbow, it went out the exhaust, AND into the cylinder head as well.  A new elbow was 220 Canadian flippin’ dollars.

Current Condition

The engine starts easily and runs.  At the moment, it appears to be going through a lot of oil with no visible leaks.  Also, there is a great deal of white smoke when in neutral at about 2500 RPMs, under load it will only get up to about 1500 RPMS.  Ok for short trips into the harbour, but for any longer distance this will have to be rectified.  May be time to think about a rebuild, or at least call in a pro!

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Cold Island

After so long without a post, I almost feel that a state of the journey post is in order.  It is strong.  It is strong.  One could say it is stronger than ever as we continue to endure what could only be described as a winter hand-painted by Satan himself.  I was thinking about what to say in this post, and the original plan was not to bitch about winter , but then this came in yesterday, ( a full week into spring now)

WEATHER

Cape Breton’s winter of 2013-2014 is certainly one for the books.  It was the coldest since 1986, and we had already more snow than all of last year by mid January.

The winter started much earlier than usual.  Indy was barely in the driveway a day or two last November before she was buried in snow.  In such a rush to get her home, we chucked her bits and pieces into the cabin, and haven’t ventured out to check on things for some time.  In advance of the blizzard, I went out to fetch the battery powered radio, it wasn’t pretty.  Mold growing on the table, bilge full of ice, and general unpleasantness.

These two were here in Cape Breton for the blizzard, experiencing first hand the fury of Les Suete wind phenomenon

 

We sally forth.  A ll indicators, however, do signal that there will be a summer this year.  I am basing this on the fact that there were summers each year for the last 80,000 years or so.  In preparation, we enrolled in an online navigation course through the Royal Yachting Association.  It’s very informative, and a lot of fun.  So far, we’ve learned how to read charts, buoyage, and different navigation methods, like plotting a course, finding your location, and finding your bearings.

 

RYA Navigation Course

The last few nights, Erika and I put the kids to bed, got some snacks, broke out the plotter, charts and dividers (that comes with the course by mail) and learned the ways of the mariner.  This is one of a number of courses offered by the RYA through Canadian sailing schools.  We signed up for this one through Discovery Sailing on the mainland.

Coming up on the weekend, there is talk of mucking out the boat… it may even get above 0°!!!

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Out with Mike

Another evening out in the harbour, this time with our good buddy Mike.  Winds were about 13kts from the southwest.

One thing I’ve noticed over our last 3 seasons is how much more efficiently we are at getting things put away.  These days, the main is neatly tucked away and zipped up by the time we get back to the dock.  A few minutes later we’re headed back home sun-kissed and relaxed.

The smiling faces of a crew headed downwind.

The smiling faces of a crew headed downwind.

A home heating oil depot majestically greets all comers to Sydney Harbour

A home heating oil depot majestically greets all comers to Sydney Harbour

An old coal pier.  My best guess would put it 10 to 15 stories tall?

An old coal pier. My best guess would put it 10 to 15 stories tall?

Obligatory sun set sail shot

Obligatory sun set sail shot

Putting away the main

 

 

 

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Mast Light Refurb

The bottom paint is on, the motor has been tuned up, we have a new slip, new marina, yet Indy site idle in our drive way.  The plan is to launch on next Sunday, a full month later than usual!   Hopefully we’ll be able to make up for it at the other end of the summer.  My brother and his family will be visiting from Ottawa next week, so hopefully we’ll have enough bodies to make it happen!

In the meantime, I’ve been picking away at a few niggling items why we’re stranded in the drive way.  The mast light has never worked.  Mostly because inside the case there was no bulb, and the wire has no DC connector at the end to even get power to it.

Please forgive the ‘artiness’ of some of the pics.  The battery was dead in our little camera when I started, so I had to use Erika’s SLR with portrait lens.  I’m not trying to get all Ansel Adams on you.

This is how it looked, the teak was getting pretty horry as well.

This is how it looked, the teak was getting pretty horry as well.

Underneath the fixture the wood was in pretty good shape

Underneath the fixture the wood was in pretty good shape

A bit of light sanding on the block quickly brings back the brown

A bit of light sanding on the block quickly brings back the brown

After oiling it three times, the wood wouldn't soak up any more.

After oiling it three times, the wood wouldn’t soak up any more.

The fixture itself is quite rudimentary, I tested a new bulb and it worked fine.  Here a bit of sanding and paint.  I used XIM Tile Doc.  I had a little bit left over after refinishing my bathtub.

The fixture itself is quite rudimentary, I tested a new bulb and it worked fine. Here a bit of sanding and paint. I used XIM Tile Doc. I had a little bit left over after refinishing my bathtub.

For some reason |I used Cetol Marine on all of the teak that I oiled as well.  I did with this as well, mostly to keep all the wood matching

For some reason I used Cetol Marine on all of the teak that I oiled as well. I did with this as well, mostly to keep all the wood matching

All done.

All done.

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The Sailor’s Sketchbook

Over the course of an especially cold and windy winter, I was afforded the luxury of doing a fair bit of reading and planning.   The latest was a compendium of 76 boat improvement projects, both small and large, called the Sailor’s Sketchbook by Bruce Bingham.

The Sailor's Sketchbook

The Sailor’s Sketchbook

sailor sketchbook

The Sailor`s Sketchbook, neat eh?

What always surprises me, is how much better a book is at giving ‘how to’ information than the internet.  For example I’ve been looking for a long time for an  article or video that details how to install your own tell-tales.  This book lays it all out, easy peasy.

 

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Windows ii

An unforgivable amount of time has elapsed since my last post, understandably causing any hapless net surfer who arrives to no doubt figure this blog has met its end through disinterest, tragedy, or misadventure.  I assure you friends this is not the case.

In the quite popular post How much does it cost to sail around the world, I talked about our plan to pay for the circumnavigation with the help of several income properties.  In February we added a couple of units that required quite a bit of work before people could move in.  Now that they are all done and a warm and welcoming home, my attention can now turn to the work on Indy that normally should have happened in the spring.

If you remember the original window replacement post, I managed to get the old windows out, make new ones, but it was then mid November and too cold for the adhesive sealant to be effective in putting the new windows in.

Indy was covered loosely with a  cheap tarp from Canadian Tire, which served its purpose I suppose in keeping the boat from getting crushed under the pressure of a thousand ponds of snow.  However, our neighbourhood is home to an unholy legion of stray cats.  Some obviously made it into Indy`s empty window holes.  Some peed.

Putting the windows back in was pretty much uneventful.  If you ever say my bathtub, you would know I am hopeless with a caulking gun.   Therefore when you look at Indy, you can tell that I slightly improved on the technique of sealing the new windows, with the first one being a bloody mess, and the last one not too bad!

Tanzer 22 Windows

Tanzer Cabin New Windows

Window passes the Frances Clarity Test.

Yard Sailing

Yard Sailing

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Summer on the not-so-high seas

What a summer.  I’m about to try to convey the things we did and learned over the several months Indy was in the water with a few pithy paragraphs and a handful of pics.

After about 4 or 5 lessons from J, Erika and I felt confident enough to head out on our own.  With a steep learning curve on the whole docking thing, we survived!  Over the course of the summer we had friends out, scared the sh*t out of ourselves by venturing out in high winds, and baked in the sun with not a breath of breeze.  We tacked, gybed, and did man-overboard exercises.

Toward the end of the summer the plan was to at some point leave the safe confines of Sydney Harbour, for the big blue.  Open water.  From where Indy is docked at the Royal Cape Breton Yacht Club, to the mouth of Sydney Harbour is about 8 nautical miles, so for us to make the trip and back in our little 22 footer, you are looking at a few hours.  With Frances at my parents, it was difficult to find a weather window to allow us to make it out.  When we had the time, we didn’t have the wind, or way too much. So we didn’t get out of the harbour, ah well next summer.

Hull #2026

Fewers on board

A regular visitor to Sydney Harbour, The Eurodam

Frances' first trip, securely teathered!

Twilight o'er the Northside

 

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